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LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
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Captain Bearcat Offline
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Post: #21
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-27-2018 06:23 PM)YNot Wrote:  
(02-27-2018 05:19 PM)Wedge Wrote:  That brings up a question for which there is no satisfactory answer: Why does the law allow the NBA players and management to negotiate away the rights of people who are not yet NBA players?

It's a contract between the NBA and the player's UNION. Union eligibility requirements are extremely pertinent to that relationship.

How can a minimum age be a legal requirement for union membership?

Is there any other union in the country that has a minimum age?
02-27-2018 07:11 PM
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Post: #22
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-27-2018 04:00 PM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-27-2018 03:49 PM)arkstfan Wrote:  I am 100% for the NBA dropping draft age back to 18 but barring that I'll take the G League signing players straight from high school. So they skim off the best, big deal. When you are no longer battling for the first round draft pick kid who could take nearly any Division I team to at least the Sweet Sixteen, the pressure drops dramatically.

Change the CBA so any player turning down a G League offer has to wait two or three years to be draft eligible.

Changing the CBA isn't going to be easy. That decision is always up to the players currently in the league, and they feel no responsibility to look out for future players who will take their roster spot.

Not a significant change for existing players. In fact if you make a guy drafted by the G League who goes to college wait two years instead of one it's arguably better for the existing players.
02-27-2018 09:12 PM
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Post: #23
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
The NCAA is corrupt but professional sports are clean as a whistle...

Riiiight!
02-27-2018 09:22 PM
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Post: #24
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
The problem you guys forget is the G-League needs to expand 100 players at a minimum (10 teams) to handle these pre-draft eligible prospects.

Either that or NBA teams have to start scouting High Schools, like Baseball, and they really don't want to be doing that.

That is why I think a one year only prospect league is the better answer. It would allow the NBA to pool resources and scout the best 60-70 prospects who don't want to go to college, along with international players of college age, maybe some hardship cases for a 10 team set-up. A short college length or even abbreviated college length season (do you really need more than 20 games to evaluate?) is all that is required to see who is worth drafting.

I think such a league would actually have some commercial value, as you'd likely be looking at half the players in the upcoming draft, and perhaps half in the league will at least make it to the G-League. The short season would make it a relatively scare product, and I could see a network (CBS, ESPN) showcasing a game or two every week.

This would also be a format that could allow players to get classes in life management, communications, finances, that they really need without all the BS stuff of college.

Anyway I think this is the only way it can fly, as a NBA office run team, rather than just open the draft to HS kids, even if forced to play in the G-League. There simply are not enough spots for all the prospects, nor enough resources to scout them all without massively blowing up NBA team budgets.
02-27-2018 09:29 PM
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Post: #25
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-27-2018 09:29 PM)Stugray2 Wrote:  The problem you guys forget is the G-League needs to expand 100 players at a minimum (10 teams) to handle these pre-draft eligible prospects.

Either that or NBA teams have to start scouting High Schools, like Baseball, and they really don't want to be doing that.

That is why I think a one year only prospect league is the better answer. It would allow the NBA to pool resources and scout the best 60-70 prospects who don't want to go to college, along with international players of college age, maybe some hardship cases for a 10 team set-up. A short college length or even abbreviated college length season (do you really need more than 20 games to evaluate?) is all that is required to see who is worth drafting.

I think such a league would actually have some commercial value, as you'd likely be looking at half the players in the upcoming draft, and perhaps half in the league will at least make it to the G-League. The short season would make it a relatively scare product, and I could see a network (CBS, ESPN) showcasing a game or two every week.

This would also be a format that could allow players to get classes in life management, communications, finances, that they really need without all the BS stuff of college.

Anyway I think this is the only way it can fly, as a NBA office run team, rather than just open the draft to HS kids, even if forced to play in the G-League. There simply are not enough spots for all the prospects, nor enough resources to scout them all without massively blowing up NBA team budgets.

NBA is already scouting high school and AAU they don't just sit back and wait for the kid to play a year of college to look at them and there is no need to expand. G League is going to 27 teams (and presumably eventually 30).

You only need one round of a high school draft. Two if you want to take a flyer on a bunch of guys.

2017 draft there were 18 one and done players and 14 in the 2016 draft.

If you aren't one of the best 27 high school players, odds are you need 2 or 3 years of college before you need to start thinking NBA.

G League would mean playing up to 50 games before playoffs, against higher competition than college.
(This post was last modified: 02-27-2018 09:48 PM by arkstfan.)
02-27-2018 09:42 PM
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Post: #26
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
I guess it comes down to numbers. I suppose you could just add a HS draft round, strictly for G-League, and extend G-League roster size by one to accommodate. Just put in a rule of one year minimum in G-League.

That would make the G-League have more value, not just two way players and NBA assignments, but HS phenoms trying to move up.

But if we are talking about 80 players counting International and guys who leave early (new 2 year minimum if you go to college, and some will want out after one), then 8 team league, 4 games each would be a 28 game season, plus a playoff, which would simulate the length of college year, and be like playing in an All Star league. As I said, there are enough good neutral locations for this: Hartford (Mohegan Sun), Seattle, Las Vegas (Mandalay Bay), Cincinnati, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, St. Louis, San Diego.

It comes down to numbers whether the existing G-League can handle it. If it's two dozen, I agree G-League. But if it's four dozen, I think my prospect league would be the way to go.
(This post was last modified: 02-28-2018 02:38 AM by Stugray2.)
02-28-2018 01:37 AM
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Post: #27
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 01:37 AM)Stugray2 Wrote:  I guess it comes down to numbers. I suppose you could just add a HS draft round, strictly for G-League, and extend G-League roster size by one to accommodate. Just put in a rule of one year minimum in G-League.

That would make the G-League have more value, not just two way players and NBA assignments, but HS phenoms trying to move up.

But if we are talking about 80 players counting International and guys who leave early (new 2 year minimum if you go to college, and some will want out after one), then 8 team league, 4 games each would be a 28 game season, plus a playoff, which would simulate the length of college year, and be like playing in an All Star league. As I said, there are enough good neutral locations for this: Hartford (Mohegan Sun), Seattle, Las Vegas (Mandalay Bay), Cincinnati, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, St. Louis, San Diego.

It comes down to numbers whether the existing G-League can handle it. If it's two dozen, I agree G-League. But if it's four dozen, I think my prospect league would be the way to go.

So

G League has a draft (four rounds last year, six the year before). They take some seriously marginal picks, I know I was stunned when an AState player who was pretty good but I figured was overseas material at best was third pick of the second round.

Easy enough to deal with.
Make players ineligible to be drafted in the NBA unless they are three years removed from high school or have completed one year of G League.
Let the G League draft players that have completed high school and if the player goes to college can be drafted after two years of college. Sign with a G League team you are eligible for the NBA draft the next year.

Under the basic plan, Joe Star can sign with a college and has to wait three years to be drafted by the NBA or two years to be drafted by the G League.
If Joe Star is drafted out of high school by a G team he is eligible to be drafted by an NBA team the next year. If he is drafted after his sophomore season college he can be drafted the next year. If he enters college, he has to wait until after his junior year to be drafted by the NBA or sign as a free agent.

If you want to make it really interesting, let players drafted by an affiliated team sign with the parent club as a free agent up to one month prior to the NBA draft. If the player signs the parent gives up their first-round draft pick. If they don't sign they are eligible to be drafted by the NBA.

So if Joe Star gets drafted by the Hawks affiliate he can sign with the Hawks after the season of G League and the Hawks lose their first-round pick in the NBA draft. If he doesn't like the offer he can turn them down and goes into the draft. If the Hawks give up their 2019 first round draft pick or swap picks the team holding their 2019 first round pick gets to take a crack at their 2018 G League picks before the 2019 NBA draft.
02-28-2018 02:11 AM
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Post: #28
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-27-2018 03:49 PM)arkstfan Wrote:  I am 100% for the NBA dropping draft age back to 18 but barring that I'll take the G League signing players straight from high school. So they skim off the best, big deal. When you are no longer battling for the first round draft pick kid who could take nearly any Division I team to at least the Sweet Sixteen, the pressure drops dramatically.

Change the CBA so any player turning down a G League offer has to wait two or three years to be draft eligible.

Carolina and Villanova and Gonzaga are strong examples of teams that did supremely well the past few years in CBB without many one-and-doners and MOSTLY with 3rd and 4th year players. There will still be lots of good basketball to call "NCAA Basketball" if you have an NBA minor league.

Yes, there will be teenagers on the D league rosters...but there will also be plenty of good 20-something and 30-something players as well, who aren't college aged anymore.
02-28-2018 05:50 AM
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Post: #29
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
A minor league already exists and 18 year olds are free to play there if they wish. There are options
02-28-2018 07:44 AM
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Post: #30
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.
02-28-2018 08:11 AM
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Post: #31
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
Can't be saved. Colleges need to get out of sports business. and get back to teaching.
02-28-2018 08:18 AM
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Post: #32
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.
02-28-2018 10:04 AM
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Post: #33
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

Maybe. I think a successful minor league with the best talent would still pale in comparison to collegiate sports. G League teams aren't going to get the attendance and passionate fanbases that truly care like collegiate athletics have. You take the current UNC tarheel lineup and put them in Greensboro G League jerseys. They won't draw like the Tar heels do. The jersey matters

Take the UNC Miami game last night. Same rosters same exact game. G League Greensboro losing to G League Tampa doesn't mean squat and no one would care outside basketball diehards
(This post was last modified: 02-28-2018 11:47 AM by solohawks.)
02-28-2018 11:44 AM
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Post: #34
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 11:44 AM)solohawks Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

Maybe. I think a successful minor league with the best talent would still pale in comparison to collegiate sports. G League teams aren't going to get the attendance and passionate fanbases that truly care like collegiate athletics have. You take the current UNC tarheel lineup and put them in Greensboro G League jerseys. They won't draw like the Tar heels do. The jersey matters

Take the UNC Miami game last night. Same rosters same exact game. G League Greensboro losing to G League Tampa doesn't mean squat and no one would care outside basketball diehards

I agree. College basketball and college football have a combination of (a) the top talent at *their* level and (b) the ingrained passion of people with their respective colleges. That combination creates a "1 + 1 = 3" scenario where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. In contrast, minor league baseball provides (a) but doesn't provide (b). College baseball is the opposite where it has (b) on paper but doesn't provide (a). That's why a large portion of SportsCenter every night is taken up by talking about college basketball and football... and there typically isn't a single mention of minor league baseball outside of when a MLB star does a rehab stint.

Minor league basketball and football simply will NOT have any more interest compared to minor league baseball or hockey. It just won't happen and we shouldn't even pretend that it's possible. What college basketball and football have is that special combination of talent plus fan passion that makes them special and that will never be replicated at a minor league level.
02-28-2018 01:01 PM
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Post: #35
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 11:44 AM)solohawks Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

Maybe. I think a successful minor league with the best talent would still pale in comparison to collegiate sports. G League teams aren't going to get the attendance and passionate fanbases that truly care like collegiate athletics have. You take the current UNC tarheel lineup and put them in Greensboro G League jerseys. They won't draw like the Tar heels do. The jersey matters

Take the UNC Miami game last night. Same rosters same exact game. G League Greensboro losing to G League Tampa doesn't mean squat and no one would care outside basketball diehards

Even if true, that's missing the point of a G League or AAA baseball. The point is to develop potential big-league talent, not to rival the popularity of NBA or MLB games.

Also, if the NBA was serious about a cost-effective minor league, it wouldn't mimic the one team per city approach that minor league baseball has. It should be structured like NBA summer league, with several teams playing against each other in the same city. Have three "G leagues" of 10 teams each, with each league based in a city that doesn't have an NBA team. Las Vegas is the obvious choice for a western league; other cities should be chosen on the basis of having a suitable arena available for the league to use on a regular basis for the entire basketball season. Kansas City could be one such place because it has a large arena that doesn't house an NBA or NHL team.
02-28-2018 01:16 PM
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Post: #36
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 01:16 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 11:44 AM)solohawks Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

Maybe. I think a successful minor league with the best talent would still pale in comparison to collegiate sports. G League teams aren't going to get the attendance and passionate fanbases that truly care like collegiate athletics have. You take the current UNC tarheel lineup and put them in Greensboro G League jerseys. They won't draw like the Tar heels do. The jersey matters

Take the UNC Miami game last night. Same rosters same exact game. G League Greensboro losing to G League Tampa doesn't mean squat and no one would care outside basketball diehards

Even if true, that's missing the point of a G League or AAA baseball. The point is to develop potential big-league talent, not to rival the popularity of NBA or MLB games.

Also, if the NBA was serious about a cost-effective minor league, it wouldn't mimic the one team per city approach that minor league baseball has. It should be structured like NBA summer league, with several teams playing against each other in the same city. Have three "G leagues" of 10 teams each, with each league based in a city that doesn't have an NBA team. Las Vegas is the obvious choice for a western league; other cities should be chosen on the basis of having a suitable arena available for the league to use on a regular basis for the entire basketball season. Kansas City could be one such place because it has a large arena that doesn't house an NBA or NHL team.

Maybe popularity isn't the point, but it's a good bonus.

For example, the Dayton Dragons and Louisville Bats both draw about 8,000 fans per game. They're both farm clubs of the Reds, and both are within 2 hours of Cincinnati. This setup actually goes a long way towards increasing the size of the Reds fanbase.
02-28-2018 01:37 PM
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Post: #37
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 01:16 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 11:44 AM)solohawks Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

Maybe. I think a successful minor league with the best talent would still pale in comparison to collegiate sports. G League teams aren't going to get the attendance and passionate fanbases that truly care like collegiate athletics have. You take the current UNC tarheel lineup and put them in Greensboro G League jerseys. They won't draw like the Tar heels do. The jersey matters

Take the UNC Miami game last night. Same rosters same exact game. G League Greensboro losing to G League Tampa doesn't mean squat and no one would care outside basketball diehards

Even if true, that's missing the point of a G League or AAA baseball. The point is to develop potential big-league talent, not to rival the popularity of NBA or MLB games.

Also, if the NBA was serious about a cost-effective minor league, it wouldn't mimic the one team per city approach that minor league baseball has. It should be structured like NBA summer league, with several teams playing against each other in the same city. Have three "G leagues" of 10 teams each, with each league based in a city that doesn't have an NBA team. Las Vegas is the obvious choice for a western league; other cities should be chosen on the basis of having a suitable arena available for the league to use on a regular basis for the entire basketball season. Kansas City could be one such place because it has a large arena that doesn't house an NBA or NHL team.

Memphis Grizzlies and Memphis Hustle play in facilities 17 miles apart and share some space. That's the more likely model.
02-28-2018 02:46 PM
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Post: #38
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

The difference is that the next NBA superstar wouldn't ever spend time in the G League - they'd head directly to the NBA club just like Kobe, LeBron and Dwight Howard did before them.

The other complexity is that the stakes of making a correct pick in the NBA Draft (especially at the top of the lottery) are *insanely* high compared to the NFL and MLB. It's never great to whiff on a first round draft pick in the NFL or MLB, but winning in those sports still require so much depth that you can make it up with good picks in later rounds of the draft and/or free agency and keep your franchise on track.

What makes the NBA different is that making the right or wrong top pick can truly be franchise altering for a decade or more. The Pistons would have been a dynasty on the level of the Spurs or Lakers if they had picked *anyone* in the top 5 of the NBA Draft other than their choice of Darko Milicic. The NBA is a megastar league and you're not winning without a top 10 player (or more appropriately, multiple top 10 players).

As a big fan of both the NBA and college basketball, I do think people need to step back and look at the bigger picture as to why it's inherently different than the draft processes for other sports. It's easy enough to say that the 1-and-done rule is bad or that there should be a separate minor league system or that there should be a baseball-type rule where you can either enter the draft out of high school or go to college for 2 years. The challenge with any of those thoughts is that it doesn't really address the core issue: when the stakes are so much more dramatically higher for an NBA draft pick compared to an NFL/MLB draft pick both for the players and the teams, it means that the incentives and disincentives are so out of whack that you basically have roulette wheel behavior (which results in guys like Sebastian Telfair and Jonathan Bender getting drafted out of high school or, even worse undrafted high schoolers that lose their college eligibility forever, which all occurred prior to the 1-and-done era).

I just think a lot of people have collective amnesia of how bad the period prior to the 1-and-done era was for both the NBA and college basketball. There were too many high school kids that sincerely believed that they were going to be top 10 players declaring for the draft, which drained the college basketball talent pool. At the same time, there were too many NBA executives placing roulette bets on untested high school kids to be the next LeBron (and once again, that's no big deal in MLB where you have dozens of draft picks per year, but a franchise-altering-for-decades deal when you're getting a top NBA lottery pick only once every few years in a lot of cases). I'm not saying that I like the 1-and-done rule, but the free for all of high school kids declaring for the NBA Draft was really bad for basketball all around at the top levels.

So, I don't really have a great answer, but that's what I see as the core issue. Ultimately, the NBA should be doing what's best for the NBA. They're the ones with the product that has franchises worth billions of dollars each, so they should have the power to impose as many or as few restrictions on who can get drafted as they see fit for their business. As long as the NCAA doesn't pay its players, they can only be bystanders on this issue.
(This post was last modified: 02-28-2018 03:01 PM by Frank the Tank.)
02-28-2018 03:00 PM
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Post: #39
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-28-2018 03:00 PM)Frank the Tank Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 10:04 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(02-28-2018 08:11 AM)solohawks Wrote:  Even if the G League paid a good enough wage, it would be hard to replicate the media attention a star college athlete currently receives. Intangibles like that are hard to quantify.

Unless fans figure out the next NBA superstar is playing in the G League instead of the next career journeyman. Won't be the same media level but it would do wonders for the G League tv deal.

The difference is that the next NBA superstar wouldn't ever spend time in the G League - they'd head directly to the NBA club just like Kobe, LeBron and Dwight Howard did before them.

The other complexity is that the stakes of making a correct pick in the NBA Draft (especially at the top of the lottery) are *insanely* high compared to the NFL and MLB. It's never great to whiff on a first round draft pick in the NFL or MLB, but winning in those sports still require so much depth that you can make it up with good picks in later rounds of the draft and/or free agency and keep your franchise on track.

What makes the NBA different is that making the right or wrong top pick can truly be franchise altering for a decade or more. The Pistons would have been a dynasty on the level of the Spurs or Lakers if they had picked *anyone* in the top 5 of the NBA Draft other than their choice of Darko Milicic. The NBA is a megastar league and you're not winning without a top 10 player (or more appropriately, multiple top 10 players).

As a big fan of both the NBA and college basketball, I do think people need to step back and look at the bigger picture as to why it's inherently different than the draft processes for other sports. It's easy enough to say that the 1-and-done rule is bad or that there should be a separate minor league system or that there should be a baseball-type rule where you can either enter the draft out of high school or go to college for 2 years. The challenge with any of those thoughts is that it doesn't really address the core issue: when the stakes are so much more dramatically higher for an NBA draft pick compared to an NFL/MLB draft pick both for the players and the teams, it means that the incentives and disincentives are so out of whack that you basically have roulette wheel behavior (which results in guys like Sebastian Telfair and Jonathan Bender getting drafted out of high school or, even worse undrafted high schoolers that lose their college eligibility forever, which all occurred prior to the 1-and-done era).

I just think a lot of people have collective amnesia of how bad the period prior to the 1-and-done era was for both the NBA and college basketball. There were too many high school kids that sincerely believed that they were going to be top 10 players declaring for the draft, which drained the college basketball talent pool. At the same time, there were too many NBA executives placing roulette bets on untested high school kids to be the next LeBron (and once again, that's no big deal in MLB where you have dozens of draft picks per year, but a franchise-altering-for-decades deal when you're getting a top NBA lottery pick only once every few years in a lot of cases). I'm not saying that I like the 1-and-done rule, but the free for all of high school kids declaring for the NBA Draft was really bad for basketball all around at the top levels.

So, I don't really have a great answer, but that's what I see as the core issue. Ultimately, the NBA should be doing what's best for the NBA. They're the ones with the product that has franchises worth billions of dollars each, so they should have the power to impose as many or as few restrictions on who can get drafted as they see fit for their business. As long as the NCAA doesn't pay its players, they can only be bystanders on this issue.

Risking a $100,000 or $200,000 signing bonus to put a high school kid who looks like a college one and done to put him on a G League team seems like a good risk to me. If you can be successful on a 50 game G League schedule, you now can risk a first round draft pick much more safely.

Kid doesn't like that, let him go to college for three years.

Every night in the G League you are facing guys who have played NBA or who will be called up soon. In college you may not face a G League caliber player much less NBA more than once or twice in non-conference play.
02-28-2018 03:06 PM
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colohank Offline
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Post: #40
RE: LeBron calls for NBA to develop alternative development system to NCAA
(02-27-2018 04:44 PM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-27-2018 04:35 PM)RutgersGuy Wrote:  
(02-27-2018 03:38 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  I 100% agree with him. There's no reason to force players to become "student-athletes" for one year if they want to go to the NBA.

Losing 10-20 one-and-done players will not hurt college basketball; on the contrary it will be a good thing. NCAA basketball did quite well before the NBA instituted an age limit in 2006.

Not really. It lost out on tons of players who had no business entering the draft.

Can anybody name any of those players? And how many is a ton? Losing out on those players doesn't seem to have diminished the popularity of college basketball very much, if at all. It could probably be said of some of those players that they had no business entering college either.

A ton = 2000 lbs. Assuming each player weighs between 200 and 250 pounds, then five or four players. Actually, shorter varsity eligibility might help. Make the kids play a year of freshman ball before they ascend to the heights, just like in the old days. The "student athletes" have a year to prove themselves academically and on the court or field (football). If they can't do either, those are the breaks.
02-28-2018 03:35 PM
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